Plant Personhood? Nuts! Now They’re Saying That Peas Are People Too! 14

You can’t make this stuff up.

Imagine living in fear and uncertainty under the imminent threat that this could happen to you:

Whirled Peas – no pun intended

According to a recent scientific study, peas, that’s right, peas, live in communities, communicate with each other, have memories, and feel stress; therefore, we need to open the discussion concerning the ethical treatment of vegetables.

Vegetable Rights?

Now Peas! (I mean, Please!) You’ve got to be kidding me!

This time, I have to admit, I’m finally stumped. I just can’t find the Biltrix here. On further thought, I suppose I will eventually have to give up eating Greek yogurt, because, after all, yogurt contains live active cultures.

Now I’m starting to feel sorry for the poor vegans: if this slippery slope continues, what are they going to eat?

This certainly raises huge ethical concerns.

It also seems to raise a dilemma. If scientists are prompting ethicists to ponder these questions seriously, should they not also be prompting them to ask the same types of questions before terminating the life of vulnerable human beings?

Certainly, there are forms of communication between a mother and the child in her womb, or between twins in the womb — as scientific evidence seems to show. Certainly, people in so-called vegetative states, like Terri Schiavo, show signs of stress when they are deprived of food and water. Their brains still emit measurable brainwaves up until the moment of death.

I have to admit — apologies included — I feel a little embarrassed about comparing humans with plants in this way. But that’s where we are at, I suppose.

The real ethical question, as far as I think we should be concerned, is not whether our criteria for discerning the intrinsic dignity of peas is a real matter of interest, but whether those criteria are not, perhaps, beneath a reasonable human being’s intelligent and moral standards. There is certainly room for more elevated standards in ethical discussion. Think of it this way:

Get the point?

What else can you say?

If you are still concerned about vegetable rights, you can continue reading about the ethical treatment of peas here.

14 comments

  1. Goodness! Should we leave the decision of whether or not a pre-born pea is a true pea or a POTENTIAL pea?? That would be disastrous. Before long, there would be hundreds of peas marching around the Congress building, and then there would be demonstrations across the country about pea-ism, and then the Supremes would get involved….it would be a mess…

    • Just wait until the carrots get involved and stage a counter-protest, demanding that their rights get respected too. And don’t forget that nasty comment Justice Stevens made about broccoli during the Supreme Court hearings over the Affordable Health Care Act

  2. Wow! Didn’t think of the carrots!! They can be pretty obnoxious, too! Oh, and don’t forget the onions! They’ll be screaming about smell discrimination before long, too! Then, the radishes will follow and pretty soon, they’ll want their own colleges and schools…

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