The Immaculate Heart of Mary, Icon of Virtue 2

Icon of the Immaculate Heart in Byzantine style

Icon of the Immaculate Heart in Byzantine style

On today’s memorial feast of the Immaculate Heart, I want to honor Mary with a reflection on her virtues, which we are all called to imitate, all of which center on the one true thing — love for Christ. I selected 5 icons of the Blessed Virgin to aid me in this reflection, and I hope they will help you reflect and ponder more deeply the mysteries of Mary and Jesus in your life. More…

Hearts of Love: A Cordial Reflection 10

by Alison Batley

Adorable Sacred Heart of Jesus, which so greatly loved men and has not spared anything for them, unite with the Immaculate Heart of Your loving Mother, so full of merciful love, and together be my help, my comfort, and my salvation. Amen.

Wrestling with moments of dark and light within the human experience is what theologian Alejandra Garcia-Rivera calls “wounded innocence.” More…

The Thoughts of His Heart… 2

The Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus celebrates a feast of human and divine paradox.  As we ponder the eternal depths, the sorrow and joy of his human heart, pierced for our sins, we focus mostly on Christ’s humanity — he who was and continues to be both true God and true man.

Today I want to focus on the person of Christ — the divine Second Person of the Blessed Trinity — and the impenetrable thoughts of his heart, thoughts naturally inaccessible to our finite minds, yet revealed to us, in part, from his own human lips. He came from heaven to teach us the truth of our human reality: how much God loves us and so wills to save us (John 3:16).

We know whatever God wills, he has the power to do: what he wills to exist will exist at some point in time and what he wills to accomplish will undoubtedly be done, because there are no obstacles to God’s infinite power. More…

Called to Be Christ for Others Reply

In this era when science is king, the world often tempts us to belittle the mysterious and miraculous aspects of our Christian faith. And yet, the mysteries and the miracles are still real.

Like a wise mother, the Church keeps us humble and reminds us that God is bigger than our limited human minds.

Today she gives us one of the biggest of those reminders, Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, Corpus Christi. More…

“But Holy Father, Bread Does Not Bleed, Unless….” 4

fjsIn the year 1263 Fr Peter of Prague stopped at Bolsena to celebrate Mass while on his way to Rome.  He is known to have been a good priest but not one without doubt in Christ’s true presence in the Eucharist.

After speaking the words of consecration, to his great surprise, blood began to seep from the consecrated host and trickle over his hands and onto the altar and the corporal. More…

The Eucharist is Food for the Journey: A Pilgrim’s Reflection Reply

By Alison Batley

“I now receive you who are the price of my soul’s redemption, I receive you who are the food for my final journey, and for the love of whom I have studied, kept vigil, and struggled; indeed, it was you, Jesus, that I preached and you that I taught.” Thomas Aquinas as he received Viaticum, his last Eucharist

Alison Batley

Alison Batley

An earnest probing of the human heart will find an internal longing for a desire that cannot be quenched by any earthly substance or worldly pleasure. As St. Augustine professes, “Our hearts are restless until we rest in You, Lord.” More…

Keeping the Flame Alive 2

ElGrecoPentecostFor the past seven weeks we have kept the Easter Candle burning, lighting it every time we celebrated Mass.

The living flame of the Easter Candle reminded us that Christ is alive, that he rose from the dead just as the sun rises each morning to put an end to the darkness of the night. The tall, white candle with a burning flame on top reminded us of God’s faithfulness throughout all of history. More…

Pentecost: Receiving the Spirit of the Son Reply

By Fr José LaBoy, LC

The Easter season ends with the celebration of the Solemnity of Pentecost. Even though it is an ending of a liturgical period, the mystery itself marks a beginning: the life and mission of the Church.

Pentecost is the apex of the Paschal mystery, since Christ makes it very clear that the goal of his “going away” (his death, Resurrection and Ascension) is to send the Holy Spirit. This is what we find Jesus saying in the last Supper discourse: “But I tell you the truth, it is better for you that I go. For if I do not go, the Advocate will not come to you. But if I go, I will send him to you.” (Jn 16:7) More…

3 Signs of the Spirit in Your Life at Pentecost 9

By Fr Jason Smith, LC
What would a personal Pentecost look like?

At the beginning of the Second Vatican Council, as the Church reached out to an increasingly secular and rationalistic world, Pope John XXIII offered a providential and much needed prayer. He prayed for “a new Pentecost.” More…