The Lord Said to Me: You Are My Servant Reply

life in full bloom cropped 11 x 15 copy 2


“Now the LORD has spoken who formed me as his servant from the womb” (Image: Life in Full Bloom, By Alison Stone)

For the Second Sunday of Ordinary Time

Every Sunday the liturgical readings present us with a mystery, and the mystery this Sunday might be how these particular readings are connected. Let’s start by considering the First Reading taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah: More…

How Important Was Jesus’ Baptism? Reply

OXYGEN VOLUME 13

And a voice came from the heavens, saying,
“This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.”

I get goosebumps every time I attend a baptism. Whether it’s an infant or an adult being baptized, I feel like I’m transported back to my own baptism, every time.

I don’t actually remember my own baptism as a baby, of course, but celebrating the sacrament of baptism always awakens my interconnectedness with all the baptized in Christ.

Like ligaments connecting muscles to bones, baptism unites us all as one body in Christ. On account of our faith, we know that baptism really and truly unites us to Him. More…

Epiphany’s Light and the Dark Side Reply

Our Lady of La Leche St. Augustine New Year 2020-0622

“Gifts of the Magi” from the Nativity Scene in St. Augustine’s Cathedral, St. Augustine, Florida (Photo by Alison Stone)

According to St. John,

The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him.
Beloved, we are God’s children now;
what we shall be has not yet been revealed.
We do know that when it is revealed we shall be like him,
for we shall see him as he is. (1 John 3:2)

The liturgy for this Sunday presents our Lord’s Epiphany, a feast of light, in the midst of dark times. The text from St. Luke’s Gospel begins and ends with Herod and deals more with this nefarious figure than with the Magi, Mary, Joseph, or our Lord. Surely, our Sunday reflection should focus on Christ, yet Scripture also sets King Herod before us to contemplate as well. What do we stand to gain by considering this dark character, on the feast of light and hope?

Was Herod even capable of having an epiphany? More…

They Doubted That We May Not Doubt 2

Caravaggio, Incredulity of St Thomas

Caravaggio, Incredulity of St Thomas

By Fr Jose LaBoy

There is in the homilies of St. Leo the Great on the Ascension a great lesson regarding the importance of the Resurrection appearances during the period of time that goes between the Resurrection and the Ascension. Christ didn’t have to appear to the disciples after his resurrection, but he did because their faith (and ours) was at stake. More…

Keep the Faith Real: The Antidote to Practical Atheism 9

By Fr José LaBoy

I’m always surprised when I see those food products with the labels stating what would seem to be the obvious. Take a carton of milk, for example, where the label says it contains “real” milk. What is it suppose to contain? Not so obvious I guess. In a consumeristic society you can’t always expect that you are really getting what you think you are buying.

Got Faith? More…

Examine Your Prayer Life 7

Listening is as important as asking in prayer

Listening is as important as asking in prayer

Somewhere between faith and hope lies the virtue of trust, which among the three is perhaps the one that counts most on us.

In today’s Gospel (Luke 18:1-8), the Lord shows us how and where we can exercise and measure our trust. The measure of our trust in God reveals itself when we examine our prayer.

Jesus uses a parable to illustrate this point. More…

How Long Oh Lord! 14

The prophet Habakkuk, in today’s First Reading, stresses the power of faith — he also gives us a clearer idea of what exactly faith is.

Habakkuk lived in the 6th century BC, when Israel had been conquered by the Babylonians and the majority of Jews had been deported. It was as if a hurricane, like Katrina, had swept over not just one city, but the entire country. Habakkuk is in the middle of it all, he sees the devastated city and countryside, strewn with corpses, burned and barren.

Habakkuk feels the pinch of poverty and destruction. And he does the most natural thing in the world: he complains to God about it:

How long, O Lord? I cry for help, but you do not listen! More…

Christ’s Transfiguration: Depending on God in Turbulent Times 9

Blaise Pascal once wrote:

“In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don’t.”

The picture above, taken from the bottom portion of Rafael’s Transfiguration,could stand on its own as separate painting. As a composition, it appears to be complete. Yet even to the viewing eye,  it certainly lacks something. By itself, its meaning is not clear. More…

“See I Told You She Would Come”: Testimony of an Eye Witness at Fatima 12

Feast of Our Lady of Fatima

Things become old much too quickly.

Imagine my delight, then, when last Friday I met someone who told me his Grandmother was present on October 13, 1917 at Fatima; she was personally present at the moment when the sun danced and fell out of the sky.

Suddenly Fatima jumped out of history like the sun did that day and became relevant and modern to me. More…