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Great post from Reinkat today. This simple, short post tells me so much.

Check out her previous post on “Sacred Geometry” too. This is true Catholic culture that our religious minds are thirsty for.

reinkat

Before the Incarnation, there were no images made of God.  In fact, it was expressly forbidden.  But because God took on flesh and became one of us, He then had a specific appearance in time and place, and thus it is permitted for us to make an icon of God as He appears in Jesus Christ.  It has been said this way:

The inconceivable is conceived in the womb of a virgin.  

The immeasurable became 3 cubits high; the unqualifiable acquires a quality; the undefinable stands up, sits down and lies down; He who is everywhere is put into a crib.

He who is above time gradually reaches the age of 12; He who is formless appears with the shape of a man and the incorporeal enters into a body.

Therefore, the same is describable and indescribable.

—from the writings of the Desert Fathers:  St. Theodore the Studite

Every…

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The Awakening Conscience 22

By Fr Jason Smith

The Awakening Conscience

We ache because we are not full.

In The Awakening Conscience William Holman Hunt places his finger—or brush, better said, on the ache found deep within every person: We either have God who alone can fill us, or we will endlessly try to pursue the things that cannot do so.

By most standards today, the woman in Hunt’s painting should be blissfully happy, if wealth, prestige, social status, gourmet eating, sexual encounters, and the like, indeed left one filled. More…

Reply

Blessed feast of the Transfiguration to all of you. Here’s a meditation I wrote based on Rafael’s painting of the Transfiguration. It is a reminder that every moment in our lives is an opportunity to grow in faith.

Biltrix

Blaise Pascal once wrote:

“In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don’t.”

The picture above, taken from the bottom portion of Rafael’s Transfiguration,

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The Scream of Nature 4

Br Fr Joseph Tham, LC

Munch Edward — The Scream

Recently, Edvard Munch’s emblematic painting “The Scream” was sold for $119.9 million, and became the most expensive artwork ever sold at an auction. This painting is one of four similar works by the Norwegian expressionist artist and is also the only one to include a poem on the frame. He explained the inspiration behind this composition: More…

Here’s Something You Did Not Know about the Pietà 2

I had no idea that Michelangelo’s Pietà came to the United States:

You have to go to Rome to see the original Pietà. But if you can’t make it that far, there are two exact replicas New York City.

If you can’t make it to New York, Here are some photos… More…

Caravaggio’s “Doubting Thomas” Reply

Faith builds on experience and gives it deeper meaning…

 An art reflection from one of my students. The original article includes the painting, which did not appear in this reblogged post.

Legionary Brothers

Br Andres Colmenares, LC

 

We have all gone through one stage of our life or another when living our Christian faith was more difficult than normal. Something happens that makes us put into question the very beliefs that were inscribed in our hearts. But Christ’s constant yearning is for us to “Believe and doubt no longer” (John 21:27).

Caravaggio was a painter who lived towards the end of the 16th century. There is something in his paintings depicting religious subjects that easily catches the attention of the viewer. Caravaggio’s “The Incredulity of Saint Thomas” tells the story of himself, but above all, of each of us in our journey through life.

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Our Lady of Light: The Luminous Mysteries 2

Our Lady of Light

Since Thursday is the day when we contemplate the Luminous Mysteries, instituted by Blessed John Paul II, I decided to dedicate today’s article to Our Lady of Light, depicted in the painting above by Russian artist, Natalia Tsarkova. (Click on the photo above for a larger image).

Before I explain the painting, here is a video explaining the artist’s relationship with the late John Paul II. More…

“Behold, I Stand at the Door and Knock.” William Holman Hunt’s Light of the World. 10

(Click on images to enlarge them)

William Holman Hunt: Light of the World

“At every time and in every place God draws close to man. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church.”

More…