Calling It “After-Birth Abortion” Doesn’t Change a Thing 16

46421050“After-birth abortion: why should the baby live?” was a the title of a serious medical paper, published by Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva in the Journal of Medical Ethics, last year on February, 23. A question this title ought to provoke in everyone’s mind — Pro-Lifers and Pro-Choicers alike — is why are they calling it “after-birth abortion,” and not euthanasia? Even Britt Hume seemed a bit confused and disgusted over this, just recently. More…

Bill 52: “the definitive end of all care” 2

Terry McDermott is a registered nurse, in Toronto, and Catholic writer I’ve gotten to know through her blog. I urge you to read her well researched article at Catholic Insight Magazine on the situation with euthanasia in Quebec. Here is an excerpt I found alarming:

“As of 19 February 2014, Bill 52 has not been adopted. According to an article in the National Post, the Parti Quebecois is calling on all elected members of Parliament to ensure quick adoption of the bill before an election call that is expected in the next few weeks.”

8 Kids And A Business

syringes-and-vial-1028452-m Here in Canada, the province of Quebec is on the brink of passing Bill 52 which will make euthanasia and physician assisted suicide legal in Quebec. Assemblee Nationale Quebec (Quebec National Assembly) will hand down it’s final decision in this session of parliament, maybe even this week. There is a concerted push in the Quebec parliament to adopt this bill before a provincial election is called in the next few weeks.

Catholic Insight Magazine has published my article on Bill 52 on its website. The article highlights the Federal Government’s response to the Bill, the history of the euthanasia and physician assisted suicide fight in Canada, as well as my interview with Dr. Catherine Ferrier, one of the founding physicians of Physicians’ Alliance Against Euthanasia.

I invite you to read the article at Catholic Insight Magazine.

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Denmark: Where Sheep Have More Rights Than People, but You Can Still Euthanize a Perfectly Fine Giraffe 11

There’s something certainly not right in Denmark…

Denmark: Sheep-Friendly; Caveat Young Humans And Giraffes

Denmark: Sheep-Friendly; Caveat, Young Humans and Giraffes

I’m all in favor of the ethical treatment of animals, but please, bear with me, because I seem to have missed the point here, somewhere.  More…

Should We Live Forever 3

By Fr Joseph Tham

Recently, I read a book by Gilbert Meilaender, called Should We Live Forever? The Ethical Ambiguities of Aging.  The question of aging and immortality does not seem, at first glance, to be a bioethical topic.  This little book by the Methodist theologian offers profound insights to the oft-ignored questions underlying many bioethical debates today—from euthanasia and the right to die, to regenerative medicine which attempts to extend life using stem cells and cloning, to enhancement and transhumanism. More…

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Catholicism Pure & Simple

Note: Whilst preparing this I looked for the article in the Journal of Medical Ethics. The paper on after-birth abortion referred to was by Australians  Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva. Mysteriously, their article has ‘disappeared’ from the on-line version of said Journal.

+ Cardinal George Pell, Archbishop of Sydney
11 Mar 2012

There were 44 million abortions worldwide in 2008 according to last month’s issue of the Lancet.

It is a huge number; big enough to worry the editor, who declared that reducing abortion “is now an urgent priority for all countries”.

But not everyone agrees.  Also last month in another medical journal, two Australian academics opened abortion’s last frontier with a discussion of the “ethics” of “after-birth abortion”.

The argument is simple enough.  There are persons and “potential persons”, who are in fact “non-persons” and can be killed.

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The Ethics of Infanticide: Why Should the Baby Die? Reply

Fr Joseph Tham, LC, MD, PhD

“Doctors said they could do no more and sent me home to die – I’m still waiting.”– Nicky Chapman

Suppose you delivered a baby with osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare condition with defect in collagen formation that makes the bones brittle and easy to fracture.  In this case, the condition commonly known as brittle bone disease was so severe that at birth alone the infant suffered 50 fractures. The prognosis was very poor, and the baby would probably grow up blind, deaf and unable to communicate and with severely diminished mental functions. What would you recommend the parents to do? More…